Nelson ® Swag Leg Desk

MIL-NS5850
$2,795.00
Nelson ®  Swag Leg Desk
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Phone: 616-940-9911

Design: George Nelson for Herman Miller®
Swag Group introduced in 1958

A Signature Shape
In typical George Nelson style, the design brief for what would become the swag leg group was deceptively simple: "Wouldn't it be beautiful to have some kind of sculptured leg on a piece of furniture?" Then came the challenges. Make the legs of metal, machine formed and prefinished. And design them for quick assembly. Using pressure to taper and curve a metal tube—swaging—proved the best way to produce the legs. Inserting a screw in the legs and rotating them in opposite directions made quick work of assembly. In 1958, everything came together to make a desk and tables in sizes that are right for home or office.

Strength and Stability
Legs screw together to make a strong joint. Solid walnut stretchers bolt to the legs to complete the stable, durable base.

Features
The desk's size is right for today's compact electronics. Solid walnut sides, back and stretcher with a white laminate top. Four hardwood dividers (2 orange, 1 spa blue, and 1 chartreuse), chrome-finished steel-tube legs, adjustable glides and a grommet for cable management.

Herman Miller® Authorized Retailer
Details to Help You Order
Materials—Desk has white laminate top surface and solid walnut side and back panels. Base is chrome-finished steel tubing with a solid walnut stretcher.

Dividers/Drawers—Desk has 4 hardwood dividers (2 orange, 1 spa blue, 1 chartreuse) and 2 black-plastic pencil drawers.

Wire Management—Desk has a grommet for cords and cables.

Dimensions:
39"w x 28.5"d x 34.5"h
Herman Miller® is a pioneer in the furniture industry, an innovator whose human-centered, problem-solving approach to design introduced new ways of living and working for over 100 years. Environmentally-friendly design, lean manufacturing, ergonomics, the open office, even American modernism itself: Herman Miller and their designers—Gilbert Rohde, George Nelson, Charles and Ray Eames, Bill Stumpf, Yves Béhar, and many more—have had a hand in shaping it all. And as Herman Miller continues to live out our commitment to authentic design as a method of change, they are shaping the new kinds of spaces where people will live and work for years to come.